Construction Safety Online Training Courses

We offer the following online courses covering multiple topics within the Construction Safety category.

A  |  B  |  C  |  D  |  E  |  F  |  G  |  H  |  I  |  J  |  K  |  L  |  M  |  N  |  O  |  P  |  Q  |  R  |  S  |  T  |  U  |  V  |  W  |  X  |  Y  |  Z

C

Our interactive course on Caught-In/Between Hazards in Construction Environments provides the information employees need to recognize the caught-in/between hazards that are associated with construction tasks and avoid them before accidents happen. Caught-in/between accidents occur when a person is squeezed, caught, crushed, pinched or compressed between two or more objects. They are one of the four top causes of fatalities in construction work, and can result in serious injuries as well. Topics covered in this program include the three major types of caught-in/between hazards; vehicles and heavy equipment; powered tools and machinery; and more.
Our interactive course on Crane Safety in Construction Environments is designed to remind employees that over 90% of crane-related accidents are caused by human error… and that they are the key to preventing these incidents. While there are many different types of cranes, they all have the ability to make many jobs much easier by lifting enormous weight. But they also share the potential for disaster when they are not operated safely. Crane-related accidents can often be deadly, due to the cumbersome and heavy loads that are lifted. A small miscalculation, or a brief moment of inattention, and tragedy could strike. Once a load falls, not much can be done to stop it, and there is little time for people to move safely out of the way. A coworker could be injured or killed, and expensive equipment or materials could be damaged or destroyed… even the crane itself. Areas covered in the program include physical and mental preparation, equipment inspection, hazard assessment, boom cranes, jib cranes, overhead cranes, general and operational safety devices, crane operations, hand signals, and more.

[OSHA 29 CFR 1926.1400]

D

Our interactive course on Dealing with Drug and Alcohol Abuse… for Employees in Construction Environments discusses the hazards of substance abuse, how employees can avoid them and what they can do to help keep their job site drug and alcohol-free. In the United States there are over 50 million binge drinkers, 17 million illegal drug users and almost 15 million people who abuse prescription drugs… and most of them have jobs. Substance abuse directly affects a construction worker’s health, personality and ability to function safely on a worksite. It can also decrease productivity, create a hostile work environment and damage their company’s reputation. The course includes information on substances that are often abused; alcohol, marijuana and other depressants; stimulants and narcotics; how people get “hooked”; drug dependency; becoming a substance abuser; alcohol and drug policies; overcoming substance abuse; and more.

[OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1020]
Our interactive course on Dealing with Drug and Alcohol Abuse… for Managers and Supervisors in Construction Environments discusses drug and alcohol abuse, the damage it causes to workers and the businesses that employ them, and what should be done to create and maintain a drug and alcohol free job site. Most substance abusers have jobs. In fact, it is estimated that one out of every ten employees has a drug or alcohol problem. A construction worker’s behavior “under the influence” can decrease productivity, create a hostile work environment and damage their company’s reputation. Worst of all it can significantly increase the chances of worksite accidents, injuries and fatalities. The course includes information on how substance abuse can affect a job site; which substances are abused; laws you need to know about; creating a drug and alcohol-free job site; education and testing, recognizing on-the-job substance abuse; and more.

[OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1020]

E

The first in a two-part series on electrocution hazards, our interactive course on Electrocution Hazards In Construction Environments Part I… Types of Hazards and How You Can Protect Yourself discusses the major types of electrocution hazards, and how employees can protect themselves from electrical hazards and electrocution in construction environments. There are a number of causes of shock, electrical burns and electrocution. If the power to electrical equipment is not grounded, the grounding path has been broken, or there are live parts or bare wires, a fault current can travel through your body. Even when a piece of equipment or a tool is properly grounded, it can instantly change from safe to hazardous because of extreme conditions or rough treatment. So employees need to know what hazards to watch out for and how they can protect themselves. Topics covered in this course include electrical hazards and electrocution, major types of electrocution hazards, power lines and GFCI’s, power tools and extension courses, lock-out/tag-out and more.
The second in a two-part series on electrocution hazards, our interactive course on Electrocution Hazards In Construction Environments Part II… Employer Requirements discusses the major types of electrocution hazards, and how employees can protect themselves from electrical hazards and electrocution in construction environments, as well as employers’ responsibilities in these areas. Construction sites can contain a number of potential electrical hazards. OSHA defines four types of hazards that are associated with electricity, and three types of injuries that result from them. Direct contact with electricity, through a power source, cord or transmission line is the most common type of electrical hazard, and can occur in a number of ways. Employers are required to train workers regarding electrocution hazards and the measures that they should take to control the hazards. Employers must also put procedures into place so that workers can get answers to any questions that they have about working safely around electrocution hazards. Topics covered in these products include electrical hazards and electrocution, power lines and isolation, tools and equipment, Assured Equipment Grounding Conductor Programs, lock-out/tag-out, employee training and more.
Our interactive course on Eye Safety in Construction Environments provides employees with the information they need to recognize and avoid eye hazards that they can encounter on a job site. An estimated 24 million eye injuries occur in the U.S. each year. About 2,000 of them will occur today, and every day thereafter, while people are at work. All too many of them will cause the victim to lose some or all of their eyesight. But eye injuries can be prevented. Areas covered in the course include how to prevent eyestrain, protecting against particles and splashes, avoiding radiation hazards, what to do in case of an eye injury and more.

[OSHA 29 CFR 1910.133]

F

Our interactive course on Fall Protection in Construction Environments provides the information employees need to work safely when they are off the ground, and satisfies the major training requirements in the OSHA Standard on Fall Protection. Falls are the second leading cause of death each year in the United States (after traffic accidents)! Over 10,000 people are killed every year as a result of falls…and 200,000 to 300,000 people are disabled. Eight-five percent of all falls that occur on the job result in lost work time. Areas covered in the course include the seriousness of fall hazards, types of environments where falls may occur, the fall protection plan, concentrating and keeping a clear head, the importance of housekeeping in preventing falls, measures that can be taken to protect against falls, protective equipment, and more.

[OSHA 29 CFR 1926.501]

Our interactive course on First Aid in Construction Environments shows employees that knowing basic first aid procedures can often limit the severity of any type of injury… or even prevent a death. In most facilities, not a day goes by without some type of injury occurring. It can be as serious as a chemical burn or as minor as a small cut. But any injury can be painful, and affect an employee’s work performance… as well as their activities off the job. Areas covered in the course include cuts and bleeding, muscle pulls and sprains, burns, broken bones, shock, AEDs (automated external defibrillators), artificial respiration and CPR, and more.

[OSHA 29 CFR 1910.151]

G

Our interactive course on the GHS Container Labeling in Construction Environments discusses the six types of information contained on a GHS label, and the differences between GHS labels and other types of chemical hazard labels. Created specifically to assist facilities in complying with the employee training requirements of OSHA’s newly adopted GHS regulations, this course discusses how chemicals should be labeled under GHS. Topics covered in the program include how the GHS changes chemical hazard labeling, GHS labels’ text elements, GHS labels’ pictograms, training and phase-in dates and more.
Our interactive course on GHS Safety Data Sheets in Construction Environments reviews the composition of GHS Safety Data Sheets, the information that’s contained in each section and how SDS’s are different from Material Safety Data Sheets. Created specifically to assist facilities in complying with the employee training requirements of OSHA’s newly adopted GHS regulations, this course discusses how chemicals should be labeled under GHS. Topics covered in the program include Material Safety Data Sheets and GHS SDS’s, materials and their hazards, hazardous materials emergencies, handling hazardous materials and more.

H

Our interactive course on Hand & Power Tool Safety in Construction Environments discusses hand and power tool hazards, and show employees the equipment and safe practices they can use to prevent injuries on a job site. Hand and power tools allow construction workers to perform tasks that they could never do without them. But tools can also be dangerous. Injuries involving hand and power tools send almost half a million people to the emergency room every year, and cause a significant number of fatalities as well. Areas covered in the course include hand and power tool hazards, tool inspection and maintenance, personal protective equipment (PPE), using electric power tools safely, preventing kickbacks, reducing hazards in a work area and more.

[1910 Subpart B – Adoption and Extension of Established Federal Standards; 1910.12 – Construction work.]
Our interactive course on Hand, Wrist & Finger Safety in Construction Environments reviews the hand, wrist and finger hazards that employees may encounter on a job site, and show them the equipment and safe work practices they can use to prevent injuries. Construction workers’ hands are their most valuable tools. Every day their hands, wrists and fingers are exposed to many different hazards, including cuts, bruises, burns and crushing injuries. Ergonomic stresses can also damage them severely over time. But this doesn’t have to happen. Areas covered in the course include the hand’s design and structure, safe work practices, preventing ergonomic injuries, choosing tools and using them safely, selecting the best gloves for the job and more.

[OSHA 29 CFR 1910.138]
Our interactive course on Hazard Communication in Construction Environments both introduces employees to the Hazard Communication regulations and provides training on the various groups of chemicals found in the construction environment. Created specifically to assist construction workers of all types in complying with federal, state and municipal Hazard Communication regulations, the course addresses the major education and training requirements in these chemical hazard laws. Areas covered in the course include background of the regulation, GHS Safety Data Sheets and container labels, toxins, corrosives and irritants; flammables, combustibles and gases; carcinogens and radiation, exposure situations, personal protective equipment and chemical storage, spills and clean-up and more.

[OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1200]
Our interactive course on Heat Stress in Construction Environments reviews how heat affects the body, the steps employees can take to prevent heat stress, and elementary first aid that can be given to a worker who has been affected by a heat-related illness. Each year thousands of employees suffer the adverse effects of heat stress. Whether they work outdoors under the hot summer sun, or indoors with equipment and machinery that give off high levels of heat, these employees need to know how to recognize and prevent heat stress and other heat-related health problems. Areas covered in the course include situations leading to heat-related illnesses, heat stress, heat exhaustion and heat stroke, how the body reacts to heat, recognizing symptoms of heat stress, preventing heat-related illnesses, first aid, and more.

I

Our interactive course on the Introduction to GHS for Construction Workers reviews what the Globally Harmonized System is all about, why OSHA adopted the GHS, and the phase-in dates for implementing the GHS. Created specifically to assist facilities in complying with the employee training requirements of OSHA’s newly adopted GHS regulations, this course discusses the Globally Harmonized System for the Classification and Labeling of Chemicals. Topics covered in the program include what the Globally Harmonized System is, why OSHA adopted the GHS, hazard classification, the Safety Data Sheet, container labeling (text elements), container labeling (pictograms), information and training, GHS phase in dates and more.

L

Our interactive course on Ladder Safety in Construction Environments reminds employees not to take using ladders for granted, and to take the appropriate precautions when using ladders. Ladders are one of the most commonly used pieces of equipment in almost any work environment. From common step-ladders to sophisticated extension ladders, they can be found almost everywhere. As a result, ladder-related accidents occur frequently in many facilities. Areas covered in the course include ladder selection, inspection and maintenance, proper set-up, overhead hazards, climbing and working safely, accidents and first aid, and more.

[OSHA 29 CFR 1926.1053]
Our interactive course on Lead Exposure in Construction Environments provides employees with the information they need to understand lead hazards and the safety regulations that address them. The program also explains how to recognize lead hazards on a job site and handle them safely. Topics include the health effects of lead exposure; the OSHA Lead Standards for Construction; compliance programs; risk assessment and monitoring; PPE and respiratory protection; housekeeping and decontamination; medical surveillance and removal.

[1926 Subpart D – Authority for 1926 Subpart D]

P

Our interactive course on Personal Protective Equipment in Construction Environments has been created specifically to involve employees in the process of understanding the proper use of personal protective equipment and to help facilities in fulfilling OSHA’s Personal Protective Equipment Standards (29 CFR,1910. 132, 133, 134,135,136,137,138) training requirements.

The course looks at why personal protective equipment is so important and reminds employees of what is available. On-the-job injuries affect all types of people, doing all types of work. Each year hundreds of thousands of workers are injured… at a cost to employers of billions of dollars annually. Studies show that the majority of workplace injuries could be avoided if employees used the proper personal protective equipment. Yet many people have little idea of what protective equipment should be used in their jobs, or how to use it properly. Areas covered in the course include a review of OSHA’s Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Standards, PPE for eye and face hazards, PPE for respiratory hazards, PPE for head hazards, PPE for foot hazards, PPE to guard against electrical hazards, PPE to guard against hand and finger hazards, and more.

[OSHA 29 CFR 1910.132–136]

R

Our interactive course on Rigging Safety in Construction Environments is designed to remind employees that over 90% of crane-related accidents are caused by human error… and that they are the key to preventing these incidents. We have all heard the phrase, “a chain is only as strong as its weakest link.” When it comes to crane operations, rigging can often be that weak link. How a load is attached to a crane can make the difference between a successful lift and an unfortunate accident. And rigging-related accidents can often be deadly, due to the large and heavy loads that are lifted. A small miscalculation, or a brief moment of inattention, and tragedy could strike. Once a load falls not much can be done to stop it, and there is little time for people to move safely out of the way. A coworker can be injured or killed, and expensive equipment and cargo could be damaged or destroyed… even the crane itself. Areas covered in the course include physical and mental preparation, personal protective equipment, equipment inspection, hazard assessment, slings, hitches, hand signals, load angles, and more.

[OSHA 29 CFR 1926.753]

S

Our interactive course on Safe Lifting in Construction Environments provides the information employees need to protect their backs when they are lifting and carrying. Topics covered include the back’s structure and function; preparing for a lift; the mechanics of safe lifting; planning a “carry”; and more!
Our interactive course on Safety Orientation in Construction Environments addresses two of the most prominent safety issues confronting employers today, that of developing a good safety attitude in their employees…as well as providing introductory safety training. Thinking about safety should be as natural as thinking about other aspects of a job. Accidents cause millions of people to suffer painful injuries every year, and cost business almost $90 billion per year in medical bills, lost wages and lost production time. So, employees need to think about the possibility of accidents before they happen. Areas covered in the course include developing safety awareness, basics of accident prevention, hazard evaluation, safety housekeeping, tool use and maintenance, use of personal protective equipment (PPE), and more.
Our interactive course on Slips, Trips and Falls in Construction Environments shows employees the situations that can lead to slips, trips & falls in construction environments, and what they can do to avoid or prevent these accidents. Most employees don’t give much thought to the prospect of slipping, tripping or even falling on the job. Yet these types of accidents account for more workplace injuries annually than any other accident category. Many of these injuries can be disabling… or even fatal. And because there is so much material, so many tools and pieces of equipment, and so much in the way of partially completed work, construction sites can be a virtual maze of slip, trip and fall hazards.

[OSHA 29 CFR 1910.23-27]

Our interactive course on Struck-By Hazards in Construction Environments provides the information employees need to recognize the struck-by hazards that are associated with construction tasks and take steps to avoid them before accidents happen. Struck-by accidents occur when a person is hit by a moving object. On construction sites this can include being hit on the head by a falling hammer, hit by particles being thrown from a grinder, hit by a truck that’s backing up, or hit by a load of wallboard that’s being hoisted. Struck-by accidents are one of the four top causes of fatalities in construction work, and can result in serious injuries as well. But they don’t have to happen. Topics covered in this program include personal protective equipment; traffic safety; heavy equipment; masonry walls, overhead work and building materials, and more.

Our interactive course on Safety Orientation addresses two of the most prominent safety issues confronting employers today, that of developing a good safety attitude in their employees…as well as providing introductory safety training. Thinking about safety should be as natural as thinking about other aspects of a job. Accidents cause millions of people to suffer painful injuries every year, and cost business almost $90 billion per year in medical bills, lost wages and lost production time. So, employees need to think about the possibility of accidents before they happen. Areas covered in the course include developing safety awareness, basics of accident prevention, hazard evaluation, safety housekeeping, tool use and maintenance, use of personal protective equipment (PPE), and more.

[OSHA 29 CFR 1926.451]
Our interactive course on Suspended Scaffolding Safety in Construction Environments helps facilities comply with OSHA’s Scaffolding regulation (29 CFR Part 1904). Whenever a worker leaves the ground, the risk of an accident occurring increases dramatically. With more than 10,000 scaffold related injuries reported each year, OSHA has mandated that workers be trained on how to safely erect and use these work platforms. The course helps employees understand the dangers of working with scaffolds, and how these risks can be minimized by knowing the correct ways to erect, maintain and use scaffolding equipment. Areas included in the course include responsibilities of a scaffold expert, platform hazards, the danger of power lines, personal fall arrest systems, guarding against falling objects, and more.

[OSHA 29 CFR 1926.451]

T

Our interactive course on Trenching & Shoring Safety in Construction Environments helps facilities comply with OSHA’s regulations and safe work practices that can prevent accidents from occurring. Twenty percent of workplace fatalities in the U.S. involve construction workers, but their chances of getting killed on the job more than double when they’re working in a trench. An average of two employees are killed every month when the trench they’re working in collapses on them. Many of these deaths and thousands of injuries can be prevented when employees understand the hazards that can be encountered in trenching work. Topics covered in this course include: the hazards of trenching; the competent person and worksite inspection; soil types and protective systems; ongoing inspection and testing; access, egress, setback and equipment, working defensively and more.

W

Our interactive course on Walking and Working Surfaces in Construction Environments training identifies the hazards of different surfaces and provides the practical information and specific procedures employees need to help prevent slips, trips and falls on the job. It’s easy to take the surfaces we walk and work on for granted, but that would be a big mistake. We depend on these surfaces to provide the support we need to position ourselves properly, use our muscles efficiently, keep our balance and do our work safely. Yet slips, trips and falls continue to make up the majority of on-the-job accidents. They cause almost 20% of disabling occupational injuries, and thousands of fatalities every year. And most of these accidents could have been prevented. Areas that are covered included the fundamentals of safe surfaces, walkways and floors, stairs and fixed ladders, scaffolding and more.

Could your company benefit from any of the online OSHA training courses in this category? Give DFW Safety & First Aid a call today and find out how we can help you implement a successful and compliant training program!

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